The Family That Commits Tax Evasion Together May Go to Prison Together

October 4, 2013
By Dennis N. Brager on October 4, 2013 6:00 AM | | Comments (0)

While tax fraud is often perpetrated by a single person, a recent case shows that offshore tax evasion can sometimes be a family affair as well. U.S. Attorney Preet Bharara recently announced a prosecution of an offshore tax evasion case involving multiple family members. This case illustrates the dangers involved when an older family member passes on without cleaning up his tax problems; this is especially true where there has been a failure to file Form TDF 90-22.1, Report of Foreign Bank Account (FBAR). Henry Seggerman, of New York and Los Angeles, pled guilty this summer to one count of conspiracy to defraud the U.S., as well as two counts of filing false tax returns in connection with his family's criminal tax evasion scheme.
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Along with four other siblings, Seggerman inherited a substantial estate from his father Harry Seggerman, a wealthy New York businessman who passed away in 2001. According to the Department of Justice ("DOJ"), the senior Seggerman's fortune totaled $24 million, over half of which was held in undeclared Swiss bank accounts. While the DOJ did not say that either Henry Seggerman or any of his siblings actively assisted the late Harry Seggerman with his offshore tax fraud during his lifetime, Henry Seggerman allegedly filed false tax returns after his father's death that grossly underreported the value of his father's estate. Furthermore, the tax return that Henry filed on behalf of his father's estate failed to disclose the over $12 million hidden in Swiss bank accounts.

According to the DOJ, Henry Seggerman and his family continued this offshore tax fraud scheme for over a decade after their father's death. Seggerman was accused of taking further steps to set up new Swiss bank accounts to conceal the funds inherited by himself and his siblings. Aside from controlling his own offshore bank account, Seggerman was accused of helping his brother repatriate funds from a Swiss bank account to the U.S. under the guise of loans from a foundation that he controlled.

Similar to many others who have been accused of committing offshore tax evasion, Seggerman is expected to fully cooperate with U.S. authorities in exchange for the possibility of a reduced sentence. Seggerman is expected to testify on behalf of the U.S. in the trial of Michael Little, an attorney who advised the Seggermans on financial issues. Little, who is accused of operating an 11-year offshore tax fraud conspiracy, has pleaded not guilty and is awaiting trial. Additionally, three of Seggerman's siblings have already pled guilty to conspiracy to defraud the United States and filing fraudulent tax returns. All three siblings are currently awaiting sentencing.

While no sentencing date has been set for Seggerman, he faces a maximum penalty of 11 years in federal prison. Additionally, he has already agreed to make a $600,000 restitution payment at the time of his sentencing; if the case follows past patterns it would not be surprising if the total restitution payments are in the 6 million dollar range.

If you are holding an undeclared offshore bank account contact a tax litigation attorney immediately to find out about ALL your options.

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