Deportation for Tax Fraud and Other Tax Crimes

Filing a false tax return in violation of Internal Revenue Code (IRC) Section 7206 can result in deportation of a resident alien, i.e. a green card holder, according to the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals. Kawashima v. Holder (9th Cir. 2010). In a long running case Mr. Kawashima pled guilty to subscribing to a false tax return in violation of IRC Section 7206(1). His wife pled guilty to aiding and assisting in the filing of a false tax return in violation of IRC Section 7206(2).

Generally green card holders can be deported for committing an “aggravated felony.” Tax fraud or tax evasion in violation of IRC section 7201 is specifically defined by the immigration laws as an aggravated felony. Aggravated felonies also include any offence that involves fraud or deceit which exceed a loss to the victim of more than $10,000. The Kawashimas argued that since tax fraud was specifically defined as an aggravated felony Congress meant to exclude all other tax crimes including filing a false tax return. The 9th Circuit disagreed, holding that under the plain language of the statute not only was tax evasion a removable offense, but so was filing a false tax return.

This is just another reminder that the collateral consequences of a criminal tax conviction can reach far beyond the potential prison time.

If you or a loved one has been accused of civil or criminal tax evasion contact the tax lawyers at Brager Tax Law Group, a P.C. for a consultation.

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