How To Apply for Currently Not Collectible Status
If you are unable to pay your tax debt, you can request that the IRS report your account as currently not collectible (CNC). This will temporarily delay all collection activities by the IRS.

Applying For Currently Not Collectible Status

The most common reason the IRS determines that an account is currently not collectible is due to economic hardship. You will often be required to submit a Collection Information Statement when applying for CNC status. This statement lists all of your assets, income, and expenses. The IRS will not take your word for it if you claim you have a financial hardship; they will make their own determination based on your financial information.

Do I Qualify for First Time Tax Penalty Abatement?
Many taxpayers are unaware that they may be eligible for relief from tax penalties under the IRS First Time Penalty Abatement policy. The penalty abatement is available for penalties due to a failure to file, failure to pay taxes, or a failure to deposit taxes.

Requirements for First Time Penalty Abatement

To qualify for First Time Penalty Abatement, you must meet the following requirements:

What is the Exit Tax Charged to Expatriates?
Some taxpayers may be attracted to the idea of expatriating in order to reduce their tax liability, but the “exit tax” that must be paid upon renunciation of citizenship can complicate those plans. This exit tax, also known as the expatriation tax, treats the taxpayer as though he or she has sold all assets at fair market value the day before expatriation. Obviously, this could result in an enormous tax bill for some taxpayers.

Covered Expatriates Under the Exit Tax

Only “covered expatriates” are subject to this tax. Three categories of taxpayers could be considered “covered expatriates”.

What to Do If You Are Accused of Tax Fraud
Tax fraud is a crime that involves intentional wrongdoing when failing to comply with a tax law. If you simply make a mistake when filing your taxes, the IRS may charge you with civil penalties, but they will not pursue any criminal charges. If, however, the IRS believes that you intentionally failed to meet your obligations as a taxpayer, you could face criminal penalties and jail time.

Tax fraud can result in up to 5 years and prison and a $500,000 fine. The IRS does not commonly pursue criminal charges, so if they have singled you out for a criminal tax violation, you should immediately consult with a tax attorney.

What to Do If You Are Accused of Tax Fraud

How to Fight Tax Fraud Penalties
Tax fraud occurs when an individual’s conduct goes beyond negligence and becomes intentional or willful wrongdoing. It has been described as an intentional violation of a known legal duty.

If you want to fight tax fraud penalties, you will have to convince the IRS that they have insufficient evidence to prove that your acts were willful. You may be able to fight the charges against you, or negotiate the amount of penalties owed, but you must consult with a criminal tax attorney before saying anything to the IRS.

Badges of Tax Fraud

Do I Qualify For Innocent Spouse Relief
There are three different types of innocent spouse relief. The IRS offers these defenses to taxpayers who want relief from the joint and several liability that is imposed on married taxpayers who file joint returns.

Traditional Innocent Spouse Relief

To qualify for traditional innocent spouse relief, you must meet all of the following conditions:

How to Negotiate an Installment Plan With The IRS
An IRS installment plan is an agreement to pay your tax debt back over time in monthly payments. When you owe a tax debt to the IRS, they have a number of ways of collecting from you, including levying your bank account or wages, seizing your state tax refund, or seizing your home and selling it at an auction. An installment agreement is one strategy that can be used to halt these collection activities.

Before you consider negotiating an installment plan, you should be aware that there are other options that may be able to reduce your tax debt. If you are unable to pay back your tax debt, you may qualify for an Offer in Compromise. You may also consider using a tax bankruptcy, obtaining innocent spouse relief, or disputing the amounts you owe to the IRS.

All of these strategies can be used to effectively wipe out some or all of your tax debt, and they can also be combined with installment agreements in some cases. Consult with a tax attorney before you commit to a monthly payment plan with the IRS.