Articles Tagged with tax fraud

What to Do If You Are Accused of Tax Fraud
Tax fraud is a crime that involves intentional wrongdoing when failing to comply with a tax law. If you simply make a mistake when filing your taxes, the IRS may charge you with civil penalties, but they will not pursue any criminal charges. If, however, the IRS believes that you intentionally failed to meet your obligations as a taxpayer, you could face criminal penalties and jail time.

Tax fraud can result in up to 5 years and prison and a $500,000 fine. The IRS does not commonly pursue criminal charges, so if they have singled you out for a criminal tax violation, you should immediately consult with a tax attorney.

What to Do If You Are Accused of Tax Fraud

How to Fight Tax Fraud Penalties
Tax fraud occurs when an individual’s conduct goes beyond negligence and becomes intentional or willful wrongdoing. It has been described as an intentional violation of a known legal duty.

If you want to fight tax fraud penalties, you will have to convince the IRS that they have insufficient evidence to prove that your acts were willful. You may be able to fight the charges against you, or negotiate the amount of penalties owed, but you must consult with a criminal tax attorney before saying anything to the IRS.

Badges of Tax Fraud

tax evasion

One of the most serious crimes one can face from the IRS is a charge of tax evasion. If convicted, a person can face a felony charge, large fines and prison time. If you have been charged with tax evasion or are under criminal investigation for tax fraud, you do not want to face this predicament alone and you should know your rights under the law.

Tax Evasion Charges

Tax evasion is considered a form of tax fraud and refers to an intentional avoidance of paying your taxes. It is not a simple misunderstanding or carelessness when filing your tax return; it is a purposeful evasion of paying taxes through specific behaviors. Evidence that you intentionally provided false information, hid income or concealed assets to mislead the IRS can be used to compile a case against you for tax evasion.