Articles Tagged with expatriation

How Does Living Overseas Impact Your FBAR and FATCA Obligations?
U.S. taxpayers who live overseas may still have a Foreign Bank Account Report (FBAR) and form 8938 filing report for their foreign financial accounts. In general, your FBAR obligations will not be impacted by the fact that you live overseas. If you are a U.S. person and your aggregate account balance of foreign accounts exceeded $10,000 during the year, you must file an FBAR, regardless of where you live.

Your Foreign Account Tax Compliance Act (FATCA) obligations using form 8938 require a bit more discussion. Whether you need to file a form 8938 could be impacted by country of residency because there are different threshold amounts depending on whether you live in the U.S. or abroad.

Form 8938 Thresholds for Taxpayers Living Abroad

What Expats Should Know About Their U.S. Tax Obligations
Expats may decide to leave the U.S. due to work, retirement, or other reasons. Tax reduction may also be a motivation for moving to a foreign country, but the United States uses citizenship-based taxation. Therefore, the taxpayer still has a continuing obligation to file and pay U.S. taxes (although they may be eligible for some exclusions, such as the Foreign Earned Income Exclusion).

Tax Mistakes Expats Should Avoid

First, expats need to continue to file and pay their taxes. Many other countries use territorial-based taxation, which only taxes income earned inside the country. The United States, on the other hand, taxes citizens on all worldwide income.

Are Dual Citizens Required to File FBARs
Dual citizens, along with all other “United States persons”, must file a Report of Foreign Bank Accounts (FBAR) if the aggregate value of their foreign financial accounts exceeds $10,000 at any time during the year. This requirement applies to U.S. citizens, residents, green card holders, and those who must file taxes because they are substantially present in the United States. It also applies to legal entities, including corporations, partnerships, and trusts.

While other countries only tax their citizens on income earned within the country’s borders, the United States taxes its citizens—and other individuals who have a filing requirement—on all worldwide income from any source. This requirement, along with the FBAR filing requirements, can create problems for expatriates, immigrants, and anyone else with offshore bank accounts.

Expats who move abroad are still responsible for complying with U.S. tax law as long as they remain U.S. citizens. Even if you live abroad for the entire year, and none of your income would be taxable, you may still have to file a tax return. If you open a bank account in a foreign country, and the aggregate value of all of your foreign accounts exceeds $10,000 during the year, you must file an FBAR.

How to Relinquish Citizenship for Tax Purposes
Before you relinquish your U.S. citizenship in order to avoid paying taxes, be advised that some taxpayers will be subject to an expatriation tax, also known as the “exit tax” upon renunciation of citizenship. The IRS will effectively act as though you sold all of your worldwide assets in a taxable transaction the day before you expatriated.  Long-term capital gains tax rates are currently as high as 23.8%, including the net investment income tax, so plan your expatriation will the help of a tax attorney.

How to Relinquish Citizenship

Both U.S. citizens and green card holders are considered U.S. taxpayers, and each category of taxpayers has different rules for relinquishing their tax citizenship. Citizens must officially relinquish their citizenship, shown by a certificate of loss of nationality or by a U.S. court’s cancelation of a naturalized citizen’s certificate of naturalization.

What is the Exit Tax Charged to Expatriates?
Some taxpayers may be attracted to the idea of expatriating in order to reduce their tax liability, but the “exit tax” that must be paid upon renunciation of citizenship can complicate those plans. This exit tax, also known as the expatriation tax, treats the taxpayer as though he or she has sold all assets at fair market value the day before expatriation. Obviously, this could result in an enormous tax bill for some taxpayers.

Covered Expatriates Under the Exit Tax

Only “covered expatriates” are subject to this tax. Three categories of taxpayers could be considered “covered expatriates”.