Articles Tagged with expatriation

How to Relinquish Citizenship for Tax Purposes
Before you relinquish your U.S. citizenship in order to avoid paying taxes, be advised that some taxpayers will be subject to an expatriation tax, also known as the “exit tax” upon renunciation of citizenship. The IRS will effectively act as though you sold all of your worldwide assets in a taxable transaction the day before you expatriated.  Long-term capital gains tax rates are currently as high as 23.8%, including the net investment income tax, so plan your expatriation will the help of a tax attorney.

How to Relinquish Citizenship

Both U.S. citizens and green card holders are considered U.S. taxpayers, and each category of taxpayers has different rules for relinquishing their tax citizenship. Citizens must officially relinquish their citizenship, shown by a certificate of loss of nationality or by a U.S. court’s cancelation of a naturalized citizen’s certificate of naturalization.

What is the Exit Tax Charged to Expatriates?
Some taxpayers may be attracted to the idea of expatriating in order to reduce their tax liability, but the “exit tax” that must be paid upon renunciation of citizenship can complicate those plans. This exit tax, also known as the expatriation tax, treats the taxpayer as though he or she has sold all assets at fair market value the day before expatriation. Obviously, this could result in an enormous tax bill for some taxpayers.

Covered Expatriates Under the Exit Tax

Only “covered expatriates” are subject to this tax. Three categories of taxpayers could be considered “covered expatriates”.