Articles Tagged with IRS criminal investigations

Former IRS Revenue Officer Gets Prison Time for Tax Evasion
A former IRS revenue officer used his knowledge of the tax system to evade more than $573,000 in taxes over a 16-year period. Henti Lucian Baird hid his income—which was ironically made as a tax consultant—in bank accounts that he created in the names of his children. He has been sentenced to 43 months in prison for tax evasion and corruptly endeavoring to impede the administration of the revenue laws.

The Tax Evasion Scheme

Baird operated a tax consulting business from 1989 to 2014, after working for 12 years for the IRS. His inside knowledge of the IRS appears to have influenced how he structured his finances to evade federal income taxes, while avoiding detection for many years.

How the IRS Initiates Criminal Tax Investigations
What seemed like a minor transgression when filing your tax return could end up being a tax crime punishable by years in prison. The IRS Criminal Investigation Division (CI) pursues about 3,000 criminal prosecutions per year to provide a deterrent effect to all taxpayers. If you have been chosen as one of the taxpayers to be “made an example of”, you could face severe fines or time in jail in the name of increasing tax compliance by other taxpayers.

The criminal investigation process often begins when an auditor or collection agent detects possible tax fraud. The IRS can also be “tipped off” by the public—anyone can submit a 3949-A Information Referral form to the IRS that reports suspected tax law violations. Other law enforcement agencies can also reported suspicious activity to the IRS.

Special agents may then begin a preliminary investigation. A supervisor will evaluate the information to determine if further investigation is warranted. At least two layers of CI management must review the information before a criminal investigation can proceed.